ALABAMA -SYNAGRO - NO MORE New York sewer sludge TO BE dumped in Limestone County -?
From: Helane Shields (hshields@worldpath.net)
Sent: Tue 3/11/08 4:32 PM
To: AAAAAAAA (hshields@worldpath.net)
Sent: Tuesday, March 11, 2008 11:48 AM
Subject: ALABAMA -SYNAGRO - NO MORE New York sewer sludge TO BE dumped in Limestone County -
"However, Seibert said that “about three weeks ago” the county reached an agreement with Synagro
to stop hauling sludge into Limestone County entirely."
athensnews-courier.com
Published March 10, 2008 10:24 pm
Sewer sludge banned from Limestone
By Karen Middleton
karen@athensnews-courier.com

There will be no more processed human waste trucked into Limestone County for distribution on fields.
Monday, County Commission Chairman David Seibert said the county had “reached a settlement” with a company,
Synagro Technologies, which early last fall drew complaints from northwest county residents who complained of
a strong odor after the company spread the free bio-solids on fields there.

Synagro Technologies has a contract to dispose of human wastes from New York.
The company, which operates with approval from the Environmental Protection Agency, treats sludge
from wastewater plants in New York and ships it to Alabama by rail car.
The sludge is treated at a plant in Leighton, and then offered at no charge
to farmers in Limestone County to fertilize their fields.
About 40 farmers signed up to receive the sludge.
In Georgia, a farmer’s cattle died and the milk from another farmer’s cattle was contaminated
by fields treated with sludge from the waste-treatment plant near Augusta.

Last week, a federal judge ordered the Agriculture Department to compensate
the farmer whose land was poisoned by the sludge.
His cows had died by the hundreds.

In October, the county had reached an agreement with the company after seeking an injunction against Synagro.
Alabama Agriculture Commissioner Ron Sparks said Synagro officials had assured him they would no longer
distribute the fertilizer on pastureland.
Where it is spread, it would have to be worked into the dirt instead of being placed on top of the soil.

The company said it would continue to take sludge to the most remote locations for applications
and would make deliveries just before application to reduce odor concerns.
Company officials also said they would alter transportation routes to avoid populated areas
and schools and explore additional odor-reduction measurers to include additional processing
and the use of more lime to neutralize the odor.

However, Seibert said that “about three weeks ago” the county reached an agreement with Synagro
to stop hauling sludge into Limestone County entirely.

“It’s just been taken care of,” Seibert said.
“A settlement has been reached and I cannot talk about it further.”

BLO fecit 20080223 - PA Sludge index